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Line loc install?
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cutlass389
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1978 Oldsmobile Cutlass

PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 6:55 pm    Post subject: Line loc install? Reply with quote

This may be the most ignorant question in recent memory but here goes. Is there some painfully obvious reason that I can't think of why one couldn't install a roll control valve in the REAR brake system and simply engage it BEFORE standing on the pedal? Seems like it has to work but nobody does it so I'm sure I'm overlooking something. Also, what size fuse is usual and customary? The instructions were "lacking".
Thanks.[/u]

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SMOKEmUP
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1979 Chevrolet Camaro

PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why would you want to install it on the rear brakes? Is your car FWD?

You need to step on the pedal to put pressure on the brakes. Then when you engage the soleniod (while engaging the brakes) it holds the pressure on the front (or rear) wheels so you can let off the brakes and release pressure to the rest of the brake system.
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jonny_b
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1979 Chevrolet Camaro

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say the only reason everyone puts them on the front is so that it is easy to do a burnout without rolling away or trying to get your foot from the clutch to the brake without rolling away or stalling the engine.

I don't see any reason why you couldn't put it on the rear brakes, but I would ask WHY?

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GrandSportC3
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1968 Chevrolet Corvette

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

FWD = rear brake linelock
RWD = front brake linelock

Anything else would defeat the purpose...
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Big Dave
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With a rear wheel drive car and an automatic you use a line lock in place of a trans brake if one isn't available (say with a 4L80E tranny). Though It doesn't allow the chassis to preload properly.

They are also very handy for stick cars in hilly country (Bill Cosby had a stand up routine about his having to learn how to drive a VW stick in a rental car while visiting San Francisco).


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Paul P
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shocked I don't get it? I would just hold your foot on the brake then you have 4 wheels holding the car back. I honestly don't see the point of putting it on the rear of a RWD car it is a waste of time and money.
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cutlass389
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1978 Oldsmobile Cutlass

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry Ya'll, my computer took a dump. Here's the why rational. I've heard about problems with solenoids and since my car is street driven, I would rather mess with the rear system in case there's any problems. It seems logical that one could engage the solenoid in the rear before braking to prevent pressure to the shoes, then brake to hold the car in the waterbox. This is for burnouts only. Question Make any sense? As far as power braking, my posi is not tight enough to overcome the left rear so I end up burning only the right like a one-legger.
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GrandSportC3
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1968 Chevrolet Corvette

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cutlass389 wrote:
Sorry Ya'll, my computer took a dump. Here's the why rational. I've heard about problems with solenoids and since my car is street driven, I would rather mess with the rear system in case there's any problems. It seems logical that one could engage the solenoid in the rear before braking to prevent pressure to the shoes, then brake to hold the car in the waterbox. This is for burnouts only. Question Make any sense? As far as power braking, my posi is not tight enough to overcome the left rear so I end up burning only the right like a one-legger.


I don't know if linelocks are designed to keep pressure away from the brakes.. My understanding is that they are designed to keep pressure locked in... but I could be wrong and maybe it could be used differently too... I have no idea...
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86GN
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 10:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of the solenoids out there will allow pressure to pass through them when they're activated. My routine is to activate the solenoid pump the brakes until the pedal is rock hard and then do my burnout.

Now that I think of it, I guess if you put it in backwards it would work if installed on the rear brakes.

Why don't you try it and let us know how it works.
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beersngars
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1948 Chevrolet Coupe

PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The solinoid just lets the brake fluid pass thru under normal braking/driving. On most kits, there are 3 or 4 ports. One port is the "in" port and the remaining are out ports. Any unused ports are plugged. The system activates via a plunger and a electromagnetic field. When you depress the brakes hard, you press and hold the line lock button. This moves the plunger and blocks fluid under pressure to the front (or rear) part of the brake system. Do your burn out and let the button go, back to normal operation. As far as reliability/safety is concerned, you could put a toggle switch in the wire to kill it all together. By design the solinoid should fail safe (non restricted position.)
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cutlass389
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1978 Oldsmobile Cutlass

PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At the strip I've seen line locs fail to engage and I've seen them fail to release. I don't know what percentage is due to redneck engineering but it's enough to spook me in a street application. I only drive to the track and back but the thought of what if in a curve at 50 is what's causing the concern. Maybe I should just find a different way to heat'em up.
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Aerosmith
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have never seen a solenoid with more than 2 ports. I have a Biondo and have it on the traditional front brake system. Like 86gn said, I activate the solenoid then pump my brakes a couple times and remove my foot. The solenoid will allow pressure one way but not the other. I have my micro switch on my shifter and I knew I would play with it so I installed a toggle switch on the dash to arm the button so I would not engage it by accident.
As far as why on the back I can only relate this..A friend at work has an uncle that bracket races and he has one on the front and one on the back. On the front for burnouts, on the back to keep him in the lights while bringing up the rpm's so he can use the clutch. I thought it was strange when he told me but I can understand it.
A side note. On 3rd gen f-bodies, the front system comes out of the mast cyl as 1 line and comes out of the combination valve as 2 lines separate from each other. I had to get a combination valve from an s-10 that had 1 line from the combo valve and use a t fitting after the solenoid. Some other cars may be like this too.
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GrandSportC3
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1968 Chevrolet Corvette

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually pump the brakes a few times and stay on the brakes. Then I push the linelock button and go off the brake and do my burnout..
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beersngars
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1948 Chevrolet Coupe

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry for the confusion on the number of ports. Mine is a Hurst unit and it is a 4 port (1 in, 3 out). I also have an old unit, maybe 15 yrs old, that has 3 ports. The extra outlet ports are to eliminate having to run a tee or can be used for a pressure gauge. Here is the installation diagram from Hurst:http://static.summitracing.com/global/images/instructions/huu-1745000%282%291.pdf

This unit and the TCI both state to "depress the brake pedal then press and hold the activation switch" then release the switch to release the fluid pressure. I have had linelocks on street cars and never had a problem. YMMV
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Paul P
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1971 Chevrolet Chevelle

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have used the Hurst for quite some time no problems. It is rebuildable if needed which is kinda nice. My method is the same as GrandSportC3 pump-lock-smoke-release.
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