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sleeving a half filled block possible?

 
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seventy468
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 1:59 pm    Post subject: sleeving a half filled block possible? Reply with quote

Is sleeving a half filled block possible? I am not familiar with the sleeving process.. but just recently had a TD 427 machined .070 over from its current .030 and decked, and found a repair that someone had previously done. There was a crack on the deck surface that had been repaired (screw type repair) between two cylinders and when i had it bored the machine cut into screws that are now visible in two cylinders. My problem is ive either got a nice shiny boat anchor, or I can sleeve the two cylinders and continue on... opinions? It might be runable how it is but this is going to end up in a pulling truck and will see high combustion pressures..aiming for 15:1 CR. Thanks again! Pictures of the repair can be found here. (apologies.. pictures arent the greatest)

http://good-times.webshots.com/album/569170707hqZQzX
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10sec.et
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

as far as i know, the block fill must be done before any of the machining so it seems that sleeving after the fill is how it should be done anyway.
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af2 wrote:
It seems we can look at our magical Balls and come up with a fix?

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Big Dave
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sleeving will work if there is enough meat in the bores to get the sleeve in without hiting "water" or in your case cement. If you have severe core shift that block is an anchor or coffee table base. I would have strongly recomend an aftermarket block before trying any machine work, but you are past that point now. If you do not sleeve the block the stress crack in the deck will continue to grow (I would also recommend head studs to limit further cracking).

Big dave
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seventy468
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ive already got head studs for it, the class im runnin in requires factory part number block/heads so aftermarket block wasnt an option. Im not familiar with cylinder wall thickness but total overbore is .1"... how much do you typically remove to install a sleeve?... at this point its either a coffee table, or i can try to sleeve it and if that fails... it will be a coffee table.. .. what do i have to lose? I risk a little money, however the price of a new (or new to me) block + machining + hardblock + time.. i think its worth a shot.. other opinions?
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Big Dave
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Going to be hard to sonic test the block once it has been pored solid. Boring bar will tell you the story soon enough. The sleeve is usually about a 0.250 inch thick so that much material over a stock bore is removed then you bore the sleeve out to your final bore size (it usually cuts away about half of the original core exposing the water jackets). I don't know what your machinist will think of attempting to cut cement with a carbide bit to get a round hole to press the sleeve in. You also need to have a step at the bottom of the bore to hold the sleeve (head holds the other end) which if you have hogged it out that much may not be sufficient.

I would ask your machinist's opinion on this as he will know what is needed and what will or will not work. Also SpeedTalk.com is full of competent machinists that could answer your question with more expertise on this issue. I have sleeved in the past one 396 block that I though would support a 0.125" overbore, but it cost me more than the price of a new block when I was done with it.

Big Dave
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af2
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dave, good call! I also need to add the .150 you have after boring will move around!
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bowtietbucket
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 9:20 pm    Post subject: cracks Reply with quote

had a 327 a long time ago with a crack between the cylinders. My buddies father silver soldered it after gouging it out and it was still holding long after it went to a friend. It's above the rings and won't cause any problems. Won't hurt to try.
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