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Tricks of the trade/short cuts

 
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Knarley Darley
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Joined: 22 Apr 2004
Posts: 1247

540230.26 points



PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 8:13 am    Post subject: Tricks of the trade/short cuts Reply with quote

As I was working the other day I got to thinking about some of the things that annoy me with cars and the daily grind, and my solutions/short cuts.
1. Like why do some late model GM transmissions have a drain plug that has a washer built into it with a head so small that the head almost always rounds before you can break it loose, partially because the contact area of the washer is so large in comparison. Solution? Air hammer with a semi blunt flat bit angled against the large shoulder of the plug loosens it easily and it is reusable.
2. Why is the cable bracket on late GM trans in the way of taking the pan off without removing the bracket which has lock tighted torx headed bolts comming through from the top and a pain to loosen and remove? Solution Bend the bracket out enough for easy pan removal.
3. How about trying to remove those fans that are threaded to the end of the water pumps. I have figured out how to remove them in 10 seconds or less. solution? Air hammer with a slightly blunt pointed bit slightly angled on the edge of the large nut loosens them instantly. However some finesse is required here so as not to damage the fan clutch nut to the point of distorting it so it wont thread back on smoothly i.e. dont hammer in the center of the flat of the nut, do it at the point, and it can be tightened the same way . So lets here it. I have a bunch of others, but I want to hear some of yours first.
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clay
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Joined: 24 Nov 2002
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Location: South Carolina
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1972 Chevrolet Nova

PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I'll have to say I have first hand experience with #1,2,and 3. I can't really think of any shortcuts I use right now as I don't work on cars daily and the one's I use are probably sort of done without thought. Good idea for a thread though. Clay
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I have done so much with so little for so long, I can now do anything with nothing.
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af2
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Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 5557
Location: grassvalley, ca
71191.50 points


1933 Willys Coupe

PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In 1982 and 3 when the S10 first started having problems with the non W/C transmissions. They had a wicked seam between the tunnel and fire wall that prevented any wrench removing the top 2 bolts on the bellhousing.
Air hammer with a hammer head bent it enough to get a universal socket there. I used to replace the input shaft with bearing under 6 HRS. I hated those days!!!!! I got paid for 5 HRS!!!( Warranty)
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squeeezer
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Joined: 02 Mar 2007
Posts: 2427
Location: new richmond WI
191524.76 points


1991 Chevrolet Camaro

PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the other day i had to take off a cat/manifold off of a ford escape and the manifold bolt broke about 1/16 to 1/8 inch in the cylinderhead

i grabbed the welder and built it up(stud)
pulled it out with a vise grip
just remember to let it cool some

1 you have something to grab
2 the temp difference between 2 dissimilar metals broke the bond

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10sec.et
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Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 3472
Location: Houston,Texas
346624.78 points


1969 Oldsmobile Cutlass

PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

probably not an issue with most here but if you have a European car with lug bolts instead of studs, and the local tire guys round off the heads, the best way to remove them is with a drill. start small and work your way up until you can pop the head off. sure beats ruining an $800 Mercedes wheel with an air hammer.

when doing a flywheel only on an older GM V8, you can take two long starter bolts and put them in the lower two bolt holes on the bellhousing and slide the trans back just enough to get to the flywheel bolts with a breaker bar. this works great when you dont have a trans jack and a lift.

i know i have a lot more but like Clay said, i do most of this stuff second nature and just dont think about it.

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af2 wrote:
It seems we can look at our magical Balls and come up with a fix?

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MufflerBearings69
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Joined: 22 Jul 2007
Posts: 746

25364.28 points


1968 Ford Galaxy

PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do something similar when doing a transmission on the ground (I hope to get a lift soon!)

I will get some bolts that match the 2 side bellhousing bolts but 4 or 5" long and cut the heads off them, then thread them in the 2 side bellhousing bolt holes. Then I can lift the trans up and rest it on those while getting everything in position and lined up. Best 3 dollars I ever spent in my life- used those 2 bolts on every Nissan I ever put a clutch or transmission in...

I too am just a hobbyist but always love to hear an easier way of doing things Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
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Knarley Darley
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those are all good ones. Boy do I remember the dreaded s-10 seam in the trans tunnel. Squeezer A welder is a indespensable tool for all kinds of removal. Axle bearings and pilot bearings can be stubborn somtimes. I just weld a bolt to the race, my slide hammer has a 90 degree bend on the end with a 3/8 hole drilled in it. Slide the bolt through the hole and put a nut on it and hammer said bearings out. 10 sec I hadnt thought of drilling those off, I would have been more inclined to beat a socket on a size smaller and tack weld it if necessary, but drilling it is way safer for the rim.
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10sec.et
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Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 3472
Location: Houston,Texas
346624.78 points


1969 Oldsmobile Cutlass

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

stumbled across a homemade tool today. i have a 3" long piece of 1 5/8 header tubing that i cut longways (only one side) for removing tailshaft housing bushings. works great and can be "tweaked" for slightly larger or smaller bushings.
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af2 wrote:
It seems we can look at our magical Balls and come up with a fix?

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MufflerBearings69
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Joined: 22 Jul 2007
Posts: 746

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1968 Ford Galaxy

PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2008 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was using a 3" stub of 3" dia. exhaust tubing yesterday when pressing the balljoints out of my mustang control arms... Amazing how useful scraps of tubing can be!
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