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Nitrous spark plug selection question

 
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GrandSportC3
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1968 Chevrolet Corvette

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 12:33 am    Post subject: Nitrous spark plug selection question Reply with quote

According to most nitrous kit manufactorers, they recommend to step up at least 1 heat range for a 100 - 150 shot and 2 heat ranges over 150 shot.

Now here is my question:

Right now, there are NGK BKR6ES-11 plugs in my engine.
Those are NON-Resistor plugs.. I used to have Resistor plugs in the engine before the rebuild (Autolite 3924).
The NGK BKR6ES-11 cross reference to the Autolite 3923 which are one heat range colder than the 3924's I had before.. I don't understand too much about spark plugs and the benefit etc. of going either with resistor or non-resistor plugs. Any information about that would be appreciated..

I researched and the next colder plugs from NGK would be the BCP7ES which is also a non-resistor plug.

So, I wonder... Can I go with the Autolite resistor plugs or would it be better to go with the non-resistor NGK plugs???? Any input is appreciated!

Another question would be about plug gaps.. I usually run .045 gap but I read that with nitrous, it's better to go with less gap.. Is that true and what gap would be a good starting point?
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clay
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1972 Chevrolet Nova

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll look at which plug I run, but it will only help you if you run the small short Chevy plug (can't remember the dimensions right now). I run the hottest Autolite race plug (which is way colder than the coldest street plug at Advance) I can get at the local speed shop. With a 100 shot and only in high gear and racing fuel of some sort I assume, I'd run what you had. I don't know the exact theory on the resistor vs. non-resistor - I assumed it had something to do with radio interference, but I don't know - I'll have to read more about that. The reduced gap thing is to prevent a misfire under the increased cylinder pressure nitrous provides. Once again, with only a 100 shot, 0.045 isn't too big in my opinion if you have a good aftermarket ignition. The only plugs I have heard to stay away from in a high h.p. situation is something like the Splitfire with the split ground electrode. It doesn't have enough mass to transfer heat and keep the electrode from getting to the glowing point and causing bad things to happen. Usually racing plugs have a heavier ground strap than street plugs to prevent this from happening. I'll look up my plug info and post it if for no other reason than to refresh my memory which sucks by the way. Clay
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GrandSportC3
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1968 Chevrolet Corvette

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

clay wrote:
I'll look at which plug I run, but it will only help you if you run the small short Chevy plug (can't remember the dimensions right now). I run the hottest Autolite race plug (which is way colder than the coldest street plug at Advance) I can get at the local speed shop. With a 100 shot and only in high gear and racing fuel of some sort I assume, I'd run what you had. I don't know the exact theory on the resistor vs. non-resistor - I assumed it had something to do with radio interference, but I don't know - I'll have to read more about that. The reduced gap thing is to prevent a misfire under the increased cylinder pressure nitrous provides. Once again, with only a 100 shot, 0.045 isn't too big in my opinion if you have a good aftermarket ignition. The only plugs I have heard to stay away from in a high h.p. situation is something like the Splitfire with the split ground electrode. It doesn't have enough mass to transfer heat and keep the electrode from getting to the glowing point and causing bad things to happen. Usually racing plugs have a heavier ground strap than street plugs to prevent this from happening. I'll look up my plug info and post it if for no other reason than to refresh my memory which sucks by the way. Clay

Thanks!! Cheers
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pro60chevy
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Go with the NGK's. Close up that gap to .030 to .035. A nitrous engine does not like a wide gap. I would go two heat range numbers lower than what the engine runs when you are not using nitrous. Don't worry about the resistor vs non-resistor type.
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disturbthepeace1
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cant comment on the difference between resistor/non resistor plugs, But I do know that I ran this set up for years. Drove it 60 miles to the track many times. back and forth to work and did not have one problem with misfire, fouled plugs, or detenation...

355ci 10.22
fuelie heads ported to the max
solid flat
100hp shot from the same kit you have.
NGK BKR6ES-11 plugs(good choice by the way)..
36 total an the motor 32 degrees on the bottle...
.042 gap with a MSD 6a

Those NGK's are colder then the most standard street plugs that is why I choose them.. They worked great for me I would stick with them but be sure to check them after a pass..... I hope this might help but I think you can hurt you E.T. more then you can potentially hurt your motor by over tunning this small amount of nitrous... Hell, I inject this same amount dry into my wifes LS1 motor....

Note: I played around at the 1/8 track with my new motor and a 100hp shot. found that the motor liked 35 degrees total N/A... since that was a lower number then expected I ran a N2O without backing down the timing and found no signs of detonation..

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GrandSportC3
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1968 Chevrolet Corvette

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

disturbthepeace1 wrote:
I cant comment on the difference between resistor/non resistor plugs, But I do know that I ran this set up for years. Drove it 60 miles to the track many times. back and forth to work and did not have one problem with misfire, fouled plugs, or detenation...

355ci 10.22
fuelie heads ported to the max
solid flat
100hp shot from the same kit you have.
NGK BKR6ES-11 plugs(good choice by the way)..
36 total an the motor 32 degrees on the bottle...
.042 gap with a MSD 6a

Those NGK's are colder then the most standard street plugs that is why I choose them.. They worked great for me I would stick with them but be sure to check them after a pass..... I hope this might help but I think you can hurt you E.T. more then you can potentially hurt your motor by over tunning this small amount of nitrous... Hell, I inject this same amount dry into my wifes LS1 motor....

Note: I played around at the 1/8 track with my new motor and a 100hp shot. found that the motor liked 35 degrees total N/A... since that was a lower number then expected I ran a N2O without backing down the timing and found no signs of detonation..

I might give the 7ES NGK's a try and check them after a pass... They don't make the -11 version of the 7ES but as I understand it, the -11 only means that the gap is set to 1.1 mm
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af2
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1933 Willys Coupe

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't believe you are running a #6. If I remember you're compression is around 13:1. Mine is just over 13:1 and I run V power 9's and the plugs are perfect after a good run. I also kill the motor after a run to get a good read. If you drive back to the Pitts you're plug read is gone.
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clay
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I run Autolite AR13's. The specifications are 14mm thread, 0.460 reach, projected tip, non-resistor, taper seat. They cross reference to a NGK R5674-6. I went to NGK's site and thought the last number was the heat range but now with you saying it represents the gap as being 1.1mm (which it is), I'll have to go back there and read some more. Clay
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af2
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1933 Willys Coupe

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

clay wrote:
I run Autolite AR13's. The specifications are 14mm thread, 0.460 reach, projected tip, non-resistor, taper seat. They cross reference to a NGK R5674-6. I went to NGK's site and thought the last number was the heat range but now with you saying it represents the gap as being 1.1mm (which it is), I'll have to go back there and read some more. Clay


Clay you are running a #6 heat range also from what I see on the #'s. IMO toooo hot!
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GrandSportC3
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I will try the 7ES and see how it'll work.. I believe that the 7ES is the coldest regular plug that you can get.. For anything colder, I'd have to go with race plugs..
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af2
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1933 Willys Coupe

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GrandSportC3 wrote:
I will try the 7ES and see how it'll work.. I believe that the 7ES is the coldest regular plug that you can get.. For anything colder, I'd have to go with race plugs..



Yes you will and you will be suprised that they are the same price! If you don't go to a Honda shop!! Shocked Shocked
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GrandSportC3
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1968 Chevrolet Corvette

PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2007 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

After doing some online research and also based on the responses here and at the corvetteforum, I decided to step down 2 heat ranges to #8 heat range plugs..

Will order NGK R5672A-8 racing plugs. They are $2.39 at Summit.

Also did research on resistor and non-resistor plugs and found the difference:

Quote:
Question:
So non-resistor spark plugs are better for performance?


Answer:
Yes. If you are looking for performance you want to use non-resistor spark plugs. A resistor is exactly what the word implies. When the spark crosses the point of resistance some of the spark energy is lost. A resistor is like an electronic obstacle and could be the cause for a weak spark. Non-resistor spark plugs deliver a more powerful spark.
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